Senior Citizens Summer Safety Tips

The US Center For Disease Control (CDC) estimates that every year around 300 people in the US die from heat related ailments. In addition thousands of American citizens suffer from dehydration, heat stroke and heat exhaustion. Summer draws people, including seniors, outdoors to enjoy the sunshine and outdoor activities with family and friends. Senior citizens are more susceptible to the effects of heat as their bodies return to normal slowly and their bodies cooling mechanism is not as efficient as younger people. Hence seniors should be well aware of the health problems related to summer heat and the preventive and safety steps that they should take to avoid these problems.
Here we will discuss some important summer safety tips for seniors. The first thing to know is that the faster you move the faster your body gets heated up. Hence seniors should take it slow in the summer, especially when it is hot. All outdoor activities should be planned for early mornings when it is cooler. As mush as possible, use the shaded areas under trees or covered porches. If possible air conditioning should be used when it is very hot and fans are not enough. If air conditioning is not available at home consider visiting public places like shopping malls, libraries, etc., that have air conditioning. Call us today, home care aides, can make sure your loved one is safe, cool and out of harms way.

Share on Facebook

Help us give back to the community!

During the month of November, Angelic Nursing & Home Care Services, will donate $1.00 for every “like” to Manchester Area Conference of Churches. MACC Charities provides food, shelter, clothing and advocacy for the unmet basic needs in Manchester, CT. Spread the word!! This will end November 30, 2012. Maximum donation $1,000.00.

Share on Facebook

The Seven Do’s and Don’ts of Transporting the Elderly

Here are some simple “Do’s and Don’ts” to remember when traveling with the elderly:

1. Do provide an extra pillow or soft booster for your loved one. As we get older, we often experience a collapsing of the spinal cord that can make it uncomfortable to extended periods of time. Better yet, keep a couple of cushions of different sizes on hand, one to sit on and another to support the back.

2. Don’t assume the passenger-side air bag is safest. To a frail, elderly individual, that air bag may be a hazard. Depending on the medical condition, you may qualify to have the air bag deactivated. Only an authorized dealer or repair shop can install the on/off switch, with an approved form from the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration.

3. Do check that the seat belt rub and make your loved one uncomfortable. A booster cushion to raise the body or a soft cloth around the part that rubs against the skin can help.

4. Don’t leave your loved one in a closed car while you run in to do an errand. If you leave the car running, your loved one just may try to drive it away. Someone with dementia or even mild confusion might wander off. A quick errand can turn into a big episode in an instance.

5. Do pack an emergency bag. You never know when you may need it. You should include: a change of clothes…including underwear, spare absorbent pads, or absorbent underwear if used; a sweater and hat of some sort; snacks such as granola bars and water bottles; extra medication such as glucose tabs.

6. Don’t forget bathroom breaks.While you may be able to go three or four hours without a bathroom break or a beverage, remember that your loved one may find that difficult. Take regular breaks.

7. Do make it a fun experience for them! Play some oldies or classical music, especially if the person tends to be grumpy. Take a lunch break at a spot you know has special appeal to your loved one.

Share on Facebook