Senior Citizens Summer Safety Tips

The US Center For Disease Control (CDC) estimates that every year around 300 people in the US die from heat related ailments. In addition thousands of American citizens suffer from dehydration, heat stroke and heat exhaustion. Summer draws people, including seniors, outdoors to enjoy the sunshine and outdoor activities with family and friends. Senior citizens are more susceptible to the effects of heat as their bodies return to normal slowly and their bodies cooling mechanism is not as efficient as younger people. Hence seniors should be well aware of the health problems related to summer heat and the preventive and safety steps that they should take to avoid these problems.
Here we will discuss some important summer safety tips for seniors. The first thing to know is that the faster you move the faster your body gets heated up. Hence seniors should take it slow in the summer, especially when it is hot. All outdoor activities should be planned for early mornings when it is cooler. As mush as possible, use the shaded areas under trees or covered porches. If possible air conditioning should be used when it is very hot and fans are not enough. If air conditioning is not available at home consider visiting public places like shopping malls, libraries, etc., that have air conditioning. Call us today, home care aides, can make sure your loved one is safe, cool and out of harms way.

Share on Facebook

Medic Alert Awareness Month

August Awareness Month

A medical identification tag is worn as a bracelet, necklace or on clothing. It allows the wearer to be identified as an individual with a medical condition that may need immediate attention. This tag serves as a tool to provide information to emergency responders,
physicians, and law enforcement personnel in the event that the individual is unable to communicate. Typical conditions warranting
a medical alert identifier are:

• Diabetes
• Anaphylactic Allergies (food, drug, insect)
• Adrenal insufficiency
• Pacemaker or other medical devices
• Blood thinners

Who needs Medic Alert?
Persons with any medical problem or condition that cannot be easily seen or recognized need the protection of MedicAlert®. Heart conditions, diabetes, severe allergies and epilepsy are common problems. About one in every five persons has some special medical problem.

Why Medic Alert?
Tragic or even fatal mistakes can be made in emergency medical
treatment unless the special problem of the person is known. A
diabetic could be neglected and die because he/she was thought
to be intoxicated. A shot of penicillin could end the life of one who is allergic to it. Persons dependent on medications must continue to receive them at all times. Furthermore, the MedicAlert® emblem can also help in identification.

When is Medic Alert important?
Whenever you cannot speak for yourself— because of unconsciousness, shock, delirium, hysteria, loss of speech, etc. —the
MedicAlert emblem speaks for you. Call us today, your number one resource for home care in Connecticut.

Share on Facebook

The Seven Do’s and Don’ts of Transporting the Elderly

Here are some simple “Do’s and Don’ts” to remember when traveling with the elderly:

1. Do provide an extra pillow or soft booster for your loved one. As we get older, we often experience a collapsing of the spinal cord that can make it uncomfortable to extended periods of time. Better yet, keep a couple of cushions of different sizes on hand, one to sit on and another to support the back.

2. Don’t assume the passenger-side air bag is safest. To a frail, elderly individual, that air bag may be a hazard. Depending on the medical condition, you may qualify to have the air bag deactivated. Only an authorized dealer or repair shop can install the on/off switch, with an approved form from the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration.

3. Do check that the seat belt rub and make your loved one uncomfortable. A booster cushion to raise the body or a soft cloth around the part that rubs against the skin can help.

4. Don’t leave your loved one in a closed car while you run in to do an errand. If you leave the car running, your loved one just may try to drive it away. Someone with dementia or even mild confusion might wander off. A quick errand can turn into a big episode in an instance.

5. Do pack an emergency bag. You never know when you may need it. You should include: a change of clothes…including underwear, spare absorbent pads, or absorbent underwear if used; a sweater and hat of some sort; snacks such as granola bars and water bottles; extra medication such as glucose tabs.

6. Don’t forget bathroom breaks.While you may be able to go three or four hours without a bathroom break or a beverage, remember that your loved one may find that difficult. Take regular breaks.

7. Do make it a fun experience for them! Play some oldies or classical music, especially if the person tends to be grumpy. Take a lunch break at a spot you know has special appeal to your loved one.

Share on Facebook

Operation Fuel

“Operation Fuel” for Connecticut Seniors, is designed to help seniors pay for their heating costs this winter, including a one-time “energy grant” of up to $500.

Eligibility is based on gross annual household income, liquid assets and a documented crisis. The number of people living in the household determines the income and asset limits. One household member must be at least 65 years old. The program is also known as the Elderly Home Heating Assistance Program (EHHAP).

If you’d like to see if this program can help you out this season you should call 2-1-1 to discuss your eligibility and possible benefits.

Share on Facebook

Signs Your Loved One’s Needs Are Changing

It can often be hard to tell when aging is affecting a family member. Don’t ignore the warning signs, because small things can add up to a larger challenge incredibly fast. If you notice certain changes in your loved one, it might be time to seek outside help:

Changes in relationships with family and friends.
Withdrawal from social interactions.
Unusual behavior, such as increased agitation, speaking loudly or little talking at all.
Neglecting personal care, such as hygiene or nutrition.
Signs of forgetfulness, such as piles of unopened mail, unwashed laundry and scorched or dirty cookware.
Mismanagement of finances, such as unpaid bills or unusual purchases.

Share on Facebook